Sailing on Russian tall ships

Last year, I sailed twice on Kruzenshern, the first time as a trainee, the second time to instruct. It was a long-held little girl’s dream after I had been on Kruzenshtern as a child, taken by my father who was an avid yachtie.

Groups are mostly Russian with a few Germans thrown in who join Kruzenshtern since she used to be a German ship. A challenge for me being Dutch and having to teach in Russian. Peter the Great took the Dutch language with him when he introduced sailing terminology into Russian. For me and endless source of confusion. Some meanings got lost or changed in translation. So originally Dutch words may mean something completely different in Russia.

This year, I’ll be taking a group of 12 men onto Mir, a Polish built tall-ship. Yes, only men, because there is only one hut available with 12 bunks. For women, there are other legs available on Mir

https://sea-practice.com/program_mir1723?fbclid=IwAR3ioEoOwoFbzVoUU7iGMFfjoaIr6ib31ZVGhwEjvnbwgqSGDLaSqBP0hvghttps://sea-practice.com/program_mir1723?fbclid=IwAR3ioEoOwoFbzVoUU7iGMFfjoaIr6ib31ZVGhwEjvnbwgqSGDLaSqBP0hvg

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